Review – The Flash, “Power Outage”

The Flash -- "Power Outage" -- Image FLA107c_0123b -- Pictured (L-R): Michael Reventar as Farooq and Tom Cavanagh as Dr. Harrison Well -- Photo: Diyah Pera/The CW -- © 2014 The CW Network, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

Team Flash deals with another meta-human bent on destruction while a holdover villain from Arrow makes an appearance, proving that there’s life after being beaten by one superhero on The CW.

The meta-human this week is a guy named Farooq who was stuck between the dark matter energy blast and a power transformer, leaving him with a need to feed… on energy.  Large masses of energy.  You know who tastes really good, too?  The Flash, toasted.

Unfortunately for Barry, “Blackout” (as he’s later dubbed) manages to suck out his super-speed.  This is very bad timing when (a) the villain breaks into STAR Labs and (b) former Arrow villain The Clock King takes over the Central City police station.

While Joe and Iris try to outwit Tockman at the station, Barry and Company try to outwit Farooq. 

They come up with a plan to hit Barry with another high-voltage charge and hope that it ‘jump starts’ his powers.  However, it turns out that all you need to do is really believe.  Because when Blackout threatens his friends, Barry’s speed returns.

Meanwhile, with the help of Joe and an injured Eddie, Iris manages to get the drop on Tockman and shoot him.  She’s disappointed that the Flash didn’t show up to help out, but not enough to stop being infatuated with him.

And Wells frets about the future changing – in what is very much not an un-creepy manner.

What Hit the Target

Things I learned from The Flash this week:

1.  Harrison Wells is starting to scare me.  We’re still unsure who he really is, in relation to Barry’s future or Flash canon, but it’s increasingly apparent that he’s not a particularly good guy.  He has a clear tendency to turn to violence as a first resort and urge others to kill as well.  And while it seems like he’s interested in Barry (or perhaps just The Flash) for a really strong, almost obsessive reason, I’m starting to think it doesn’t bode well for Barry.

2.  Speaking of canon characters… whoever Eddie Thawne is, I don’t think he’s the character we all assumed based on his name.  Unlike Wells, Eddie started out seeming a little suspicious but has grown less and less so as stories have progressed.  I’d like to learn more about him as a character, rather than just Iris’ love-interest.

3.  That’s an interesting list of characters introduced into series canon by Wells during his confrontation with Farooq.  I hope not all of them are truly lost.

What Missed the Mark

 I hope we’re not done with the Clock King yet.  He’s a good villain excellently played by Robert Knepper (who will forever be “T-Bag”, to me).  But he gets short-changed in this episode (as he did in Arrow as well) by being second-fiddle to the advertised villain of the week.

No wonder this town needs The Flash – their police force is kind of lame.

However, apparently the general citizenry of Central City is less lame than the police, because there’s not nearly the kind of public chaos that a city-wide power outage (and lack of police presence) should have caused.  I guess the real riff-raff move to Starling City instead.

Why didn’t Tockman just escape into the darkened city when he first had the chance?  Sticking around long enough to be surrounded by police and stuck in a hostage stand-off seemed really unnecessary for a guy with his skills.

The Final Score

This episode was tight and full of great tension, despite the fact that there was as unnecessary storyline inserted.  Farooq was creepy, as was his assault on STAR Labs.  It was actually nice to see Tony Woodward’s storyline finalized and Tockman had a memorable, if fairly pointless appearance.  There are hints of the greater DC comics universe in this story, as well as clues to maybe even the Crisis events we’ve been wondering about since the pilot.

 

Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman Get Victorian in First Photo From ‘Sherlock’ Special

Originally posted on Variety:

Thanks to “Sherlock’s” British broadcaster BBC One, we have our first look at stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman in the upcoming special episode, and the dynamic duo are apparently getting in touch with their iconic characters’ literary roots, looking downright Victorian in the new photo.

An earlier tweet — which included a photo of the special’s script — alerted fans that a preview of the one-off was forthcoming, promising a look at the two “as they’ll appear in the special,” which is set to air sometime in 2015. This note has led to a flurry of fan speculation regarding time-travel and/or a game of dress-up.

Either way, viewer interest is…

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‘Star Wars’ Trailer to Debut at 30 Theaters on Friday

Living the Geek Life:

My closest theater is just far enough away to make me have to seriously debate how much of a fan I am! Argh, not fair!

Originally posted on Variety:

UPDATE: The Force is coming to theaters on Friday, with 30 locations rolling out an 88-second tease of “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” in front of every film over the holiday weekend.

Lucasfilm and Disney will premiere the first trailer for “Episode VII” at venues including Regal, AMC, and Cinemark.

Universal releases the first trailer for “Jurassic World” on Thursday, during Thanksgiving football on NBC, the day before the “Star Wars” reveal.

The locations screening the “Star Wars” trailer are:

PHOENIX, AZ: HARKINS TEMPE MARKETPLACE
LOS ANGELES, CA: AMC CENTURY CITY
LOS ANGELES, CA: EL CAPITAN
IRVINE, CA: REGAL SPECTRUM 21
SAN FRANCISCO, CA: AMC METERON 16
SAN JOSE, CA: CINEMARK OAKRIDGE 20
SAN DIEGO, CA: REGAL MIRA MESA 18
TORONTO, CANADA: CPX YOUNGE & DUNDAS
VANCOUVER, CANADA: CPX RIVERPORT
DENVER, CO: AMC WESTMINSTER 24
WASHINGTON DC: AMC TYSONS CORNER 16
MIAMI, FL: CARMIKE PARISIAN 20
ATLANTA, GA: REGAL ATLANTIC…

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Listen to Jennifer Lawrence Sing in the New ‘Hunger Games’

Living the Geek Life:

This was one of the real highlights of the film. Loved this whole, gorgeous scene!

Originally posted on Variety:

Jennifer Lawrence was reportedly so worried about singing this sorrowful tune in “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1,” she cried the day of the recording.

“She’d probably tell you it was her least favorite day,” director Francis Lawrence said in an interview. “She was horrified to sing, she cried a little bit in the morning before she had to sing.”

Judging by the recording, however, the Oscar-winner sounds like a natural.

The song, called “The Hanging Tree,” was composed by James Newton and the Lumineers, and is featured in the new Lionsgate film.

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